TITAN II FACT SHEET
The weight of the TITAN II was 341000 lbs.                                   
Each TITAN II missile originally cost                         $3,045,872
TITAN II ACTIVATION (ON ALERT)                        1962
PROJECTED YEARS OF SERVICE                10 YEARS
TITAN II DEACTIVATION (OFF ALERT)                1987
ACTUAL TIME OF SERVICE       25 YEARS, 4 MONTHS, 18 DAYS                           
                                                                                   
                    
The total length of the TITAN II  was 110 FT
The Mark 6 reentry vehicle (RV) carried the 9 megaton W-53 thermo-nuclear warhead, which weighed 8380 LBS and had a range of 5500 miles and traveled at 15000 mph.
The reentry vehicle and adapter was almost 14 FT long.
The Mark 6 reentry vehicle was developed by General Electric
RV
The diameter of the TITAN II was 10 FT
The TITAN 1 ICBM and the TITAN II ICBM were developed by The Martin Company (later, Martin-Marietta) during the 1950's. Engines were developed by Aerojet-General.
TITAN DEPLOYMENT SCHEDULE
1962-1965

BASE                          WING               SQUADRON              ACTIVATION         DEACTIVATION

LOWRY AFB              451 SMW           724 SMS                 FEB 1962              JUNE 1965
COLORADO                                           725 SMS




BEALE AFB              456 SMW            851 SMS                 FEB 1961             MARCH 1965
CALIFORNIA




LARSON AFB           462 SAW            568 SMS                 APRIL 1961         MARCH 1965
WASHINGTON




MOUNTAIN HOME    9TH SRW           569 SMS                 JUNE 1961         JUNE 1965
IDAHO





ELLSWORTH AFB   44TH SMW         850 SMS                 DEC  1960         MARCH 1965
SOUTH DAKOTA




The stage II engine produced 100,000 lbs of thrust
STAGE II
19.26  FT. in length
37,206 lbs     oxidizer
20,696 lbs.    fuel (hydrazine)
The TITAN II was a two stage, liquid-fueled Intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) At 110 feet in length and 10 feet in diameter, it was the largest ICBM in U.S. Air Force inventory.
Stage 1 engine
in maintenance bay (MIMS)
The TITAN I  preceeded the TITAN II
it was somewhat smaller and shorter and utilized liquid oxygen as its oxidizer component. Launch complexes were in 3x3 configuration (3 missiles per complex, 3 complexes per squadron) as opposed to 1 missile per complex and 9 complexes per squadron for the TITAN II system.
STAGE I
70.00 FT. in length
160,637 lbs   oxidizer
83,232   lbs   fuel (hydrazine)
The stage I engines produced
341,000 lbs of thrust
The Titan II ICBM missile combat crew consisted of four USAF personnel. Two commissioned officers and two enlisted personnel. The senior officer was designated the Missile Combat Crew Commander (MCCC). The second officer was the Deputy Missile Combat Crew Commander (DMCCC), they managed all operations with the Titan II , also received and decoded all orders for launch of the Titan II ICBM.
The Ballistic Missile Analyst Technician (BMAT) was responsible for missile status, guidance and support equipment. The Missile Facilities Technician (MFT) kept an eye on power, water and other support equipment.
Each combat crew spent twenty-four hours on alert. Crew change-over would take place at 0700

TITAN II's were flown in NASA's GEMINI manned space program in the mid 1960's
Deactivated missiles are in storage at Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson, Arizona
140 TITAN II ICBM's were built , once the mainstay of the United States strategic missile force.
VANDENBERG AFB,  Calif.-
The final Titan II rocket streaked skyward Oct. 18, leaving in its wake a 40-year history that included a transformation from intercontinental ballistic missile to space booster. (Courtesy photo)
TITAN II BLASTS ITS WAY INTO HISTORY
by Maj. Dan Wetmore
30th Space Wing Public Affairs

10/24/2003 - VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AFPN) - As the final Titan II rocket streaked skyward from here Oct. 18, it left in its wake a 40-year hstory that included a transformation from intercontinental ballistic missile to space booster.
The two-stage, liquid-propelled, silo-based Titan II was developed for the United States' budding ICBM program. The missiles served on the front lines of the Cold War.
Among the quartet of subterranean sentinels that held that duty, including Atlas, Titan, Minuteman and Peacekeeper, the Titan cast the longest shadow. It was tipped with the largest warhead ever fielded by the United States, the 9-megaton Mark 6, with an explosive equivalence 600 times of that released at Hiroshima. The Titan stood watch from 1963-1987.
The first Titan II ICBM test-launched from here Feb. 16, 1963. The missile exploded less than a minute after launch.
Maybe it was the name.
"In the early days, they used to give missiles nicknames," said Jeffrey Geiger, 30th Space Wing historian. "This one was called 'Awfully Tired'
"Maybe it was so tired it just blew up," he said
Despite the first disaster, the Titan II program forged ahead. The next missile test launch was April 27, 1963. In the next 24 years, 56 more Titan II ICBMs launched from here.
Then came the more efficient Minuteman ICBMs, and the Titan II missile became obsolete, Geiger said.
The Titan II weapon system was deactivated May 5, 1987.
"Once the missile lost its operational viability, it became a space booster." Geiger said.
In 1988, following decommissioning of the Titan II as a weapon system, 14 of the 54 remaining vehicles were reacquired by Lockheed Martin Corp. The missiles were then retrofitted for spacelift duty.
Since 1989, 12 of those have flown from Vandenberg's shore, successfully placing a wide array of pay;oads into polar, low-Earth orbit.
One of the more unique aspects of the Titan's history is its involvement with the manned-space program.
In the 10 flights of the Gemini program from 1965 to 1966, modified Titan IIs carried two-person spacecrafts aloft. These flights focused on the logistics of "twinning"spacecraft in orbit, rendezvous and docking procedures to which thw Saturn-based Apollo missions were heir, and which brought the first moon landing in 1969.
Those early Gemini flights were not the Titan II's only contribution to lunar exploration.
"The Titan II's most interesting payload was the Clementine mission provided evidence of water on the moon. This was also the first lunar launch from Vandenberg.
Of all the Titan II's built by the Martin Company between 1962 to 1967, 95 have passed fully into history. Two were destroyed in accidents, while 93 have performed their intended function.
Of those, the second-to-last forged was the last to fly, providing the 430,000 pounds of thrust that took the 16th in a series of weather satillites for its six-minute ride 100 nautical miles into space. (Courtesy of Air Force Space Command News Service. First Lt. Michelle Mayo contributed to this story.)


The TITAN II  took 6 minutes to go from launch to 100 nautical miles into space.
Gemini Program Logo





Gemini 3
March 23, 1965
"Molly Brown"



Gemini 4
June 3-7, 1965
"1st Space Walk"




Gemini 5
August 21-28, 1965
"120 Orbits"



Gemini 6
December 15-16, 1965
"Redezvous/G-7"



Gemini 7
December 4-17, 1965
"206 Orbits"




Gemini 8
March 16, 1966
"First Docking/Agena"




Gemini 9
June 3, 1966
"2 Hour Space Walk"



Gemini 10
July 18-21, 1966
"2 Agena Rendezvous"




Gemini 11
September 12-15, 1966
"Rendezvous/Docking"



Gemini 12
November 11-15, 1966
"3 Spacewalks"
GEMINI PROGRAM MISSION
PATCHES
TITAN II SPACE LAUNCH VEHICLE
TITAN II DEPLOYMENT SCHEDULE
1962-1987

BASE                        WING               SQUADRON               ACTIVATION        DEACTIVATION

DAVIS-MONTHAN   390  SMW         390 MIMS                 JAN 1962             JULY 1984
ARIZONA




                                                     570 SMS    571 SMS





McCONNELL AFB   381 SMW         381 MIMS                  DEC 1963           AUG 1986
KANSAS




                                                     532 SMS   533 SMS






LITTLE ROCK AFB   308 SMW        308 MIMS                  APRIL 1962          AUG 1987
ARKNSAS




                                                     373 SMS   374 SMS






VANDENBERG        1ST SAD          394 SMS
CALIFORNIA




                                                              395 SMS




30TH SPACE WING
VANDENBERG AFB